Here’s WHY AR LAWS Get Funded…….

Los Angeles, Berkeley, Stanford, McGeroge (law schools…)

http://www.calsymposium.com/panels/

They had a long list. Below are just………

……..Just a small example of one of the ARs (ALDF) in animal rights legal stuff:

ANIMAL ADVOCACY: WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THE CAPITOL AND HOW TO JOIN THE FIGHT  

Kevin O’Neill, ASPCA / Jacqueline Logan, Humane Society of the United States

Join Kevin O’Neill and Jacqueline Logan for a discussion about the California Legislature and what’s happening in Sacramento to improve animal welfare. Jacqueline and Kevin will share updates on recent fights to defend hard fought protections as well as share news on proactive legislative successes that further the cause of animal welfare in California.  In addition, you will hear useful tips about being an effective citizen lobbyist and how to approach your legislator to discuss animal welfare policy.  Knowing the basic structure of the Legislature and how the process works are critical components to being an effective citizen advocate for animals.

Hosted by: University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

 

EARNING TO GIVE: WHY YOU SHOULDN’T WORK FOR AN ANIMAL ORGANIZATION

Dan Phillips, Global Animal Protection Initiative

Many people who care about animals believe they can help most by joining an animal welfare organization.  However, the animal welfare movement is severely constrained by the amount of funds it has available. The limiting factor in achieving more for animals is often not more people or ideas, but money.  Therefore, students who are able to obtain high-paying jobs may want to consider whether they may best serve animals by taking those jobs and donating money to effective animal welfare organizations.

Hosted by: Stanford Law School

 

ANIMAL WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENTALISM: STRATEGIES FOR CROSS-MOVEMENT ACTIVISM

Joyce Tischler, The Animal Legal Defense Fund / Kirk Smith, UC Berkeley /  Keegan KuhnCowspiracy

The exploitation of animals, especially farmed animals and wildlife, negatively impacts both the animals and the environment. Animal protectionists and environmentalists have traditionally viewed themselves as distinct movements with sometimes conflicting agendas. Is there a middle ground? Can these movements work more closely together to serve their common interests? An environmentalist, an animal lawyer and a documentarian explore the possibilities.

Hosted by: UC Berkeley School of Law

ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION: LITIGATION, ACTIVISM, AND ETHICS

Kathy Guillermo, PETAChristopher Berry, The Animal Legal Defense Fund / Larry Carbone, Lab Animal Resource Center

This panel will include a current overview of the socio-legal status of animal research & experimentation, why it’s important, and potential avenues for reform and/or involvement. Speakers will explore issues of advocacy both within and outside the courtroom as well as policy and ethical considerations.

Hosted by: University of California, Los Angeles

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animal rights on the left…………….innocent bird on the right…….

fox chick

 

…….and just when you thought you had seen everything, look at this:

ACCIDENT AND INJURY LAW

Woman whose 4 pit bulls killed neighbor’s dog, in its own yard, sues neighbor for $1M


Last month, four pit bulls owned by Emerald White reportedly went through a boundary fence between two Texas homes and killed her neighbor’s 10-year-old beagle.

Now a lawsuit has been filed—by White—against the owner of the beagle because White says she was injured after she herself went onto her neighbor’s property and tried to stop the attack. The Associated Press and the Galveston County Daily Newshave stories.

White is seeking as much as $1 million in damages in the 405th District case, alleging that defendant Steve Baker failed to confine his now-deceased dog, Bailey.

The plaintiff says she was “unexpectedly and viciously attacked” and suffered “multiple serious bite and scratch-type injuries requiring ongoing medical treatment.” She also says she “now suffers … from fear anxiety and trepidation” because of the “unprovoked attack.”

Baker was stunned by news of the suit. He told the Galveston paper he made a conscious decision not to sue White, since her dogs have been declared dangerous, which requires her to take enhanced security measures. Suing her would not bring back his own dog, he said.

“The police took the action I wanted and declared those dogs dangerous and awareness was raised; so I decided to let it go,” he said. “Now they’re suing me for $1 million—I just can’t believe it.”

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